Ancient reptile Captorhinus could detach its tail to elude predators

A new study by the University of Toronto Mississauga research team led by Professor Robert Reisz and PhD student Aaron LeBlanc, published March 5 in the open source journal, Scientific Reports, shows how a group of small reptiles who lived 289 million years ago could detach their tails to escape the grasp of their would-be predators -- the oldest known example of such behaviour.

Ancient reptile Captorhinus could detach its tail to elude predators

Imagine a voracious carnivore sinking its teeth into the tail of a small reptile, anticipating a delicious lunch, when, in a flash, the reptile is gone and the carnivore is left holding a wiggling ...

Tue 6 Mar 18 from Phys.org

Ancient Animal Could Take Itself Apart to Escape Predators

A fossil lizard is the oldest known reptile that can lose its tail and survive, an ability still seen in modern species.

Wed 7 Mar 18 from National Geographic

Permian lizard detached tail to escape predators, a trait still found in modern lizards

It took more than a hundred million years before lizards re-evolved this feature.

Wed 7 Mar 18 from ZME Science

Ancient Reptile Could Detach Tail to Escape Predator's Grasp

Wed 7 Mar 18 from Laboratory Equipment

Ancient reptile could detach its tail to escape the jaws of predators

The ability to detach a limb is an escape strategy used by modern lizards, but new research suggests the reptile {i:Captorhinus} was the first to use the trick.

Tue 6 Mar 18 from UPI

Oldest reptile that could detach its tail identified

The reptiles, called Captorhinus, weighed less than two kilograms and lived during the Early Permian period

Wed 7 Mar 18 from The Hindu

Ancient reptile Captorhinus could detach its tail to escape predator's grasp

A new study shows how a group of small reptiles who lived 289 million years ago could detach their tails to escape the grasp of their would-be predators -- the oldest known example of such behavior. ...

Tue 6 Mar 18 from ScienceDaily

Escape artist

A new study by the University of Toronto Mississauga research team led by Professor Robert Reisz and PhD student Aaron LeBlanc, published March 5 in the open source journal, Scientific Reports, ...

Tue 6 Mar 18 from Eurekalert

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