Neanderthals Had Feelings, Too

Our closest ancient relatives cared for their sick and the elderly much as we humans do, says Penny SpikinsDr Penny Spikins is a young archaeologist at the University of York who focuses her research on social and cognitive evolution and prehistoric social dynamics, writing across a diverse range of subjects including the role of prestigious leaders and the occurrence of autism in past societies.In her new book, The Prehistory of Compassion, written with researchers Holly Rutherford and Andy Needham, she rejects the popular portrayal of Neanderthals as simple, unfeeling brutes and suggests that our closest ancient relatives may well have demonstrated a level of compassion that would put many modern humans to shame, caring for the infirm and the vulnerable for years at a time in organised groups.What is the evidence for compassion in Neanderthals?An example for Neanderthals is of a man found in the Shanidar cave in Iraq with one withered arm, deformities in both legs and a crushed skull which probably made him

Neanderthals Had Feelings, Too

For decades, Neanderthal was cultural shorthand for primitive. Our closest non-living relatives were caricatured as lumbering, slope-browed simpletons unable to keep pace with nimble, quick-witted ...

Tue 5 Oct 10 from Wired Science

Neanderthals Had Feelings Too, Tue 5 Oct 10 from RedOrbit

Featured - Neanderthals had feelings too, Tue 5 Oct 10 from Labspaces.net

Neanderthals had feelings too, say University of York researchers, Tue 5 Oct 10 from e! Science News

Neanderthals had feelings too, say researchers

Pioneering new research by archaeologists at the University of York suggests that Neanderthals belied their primitive reputation and had a deep seated sense of compassion.

Tue 5 Oct 10 from Phys.org

Neanderthals had feelings too, say researchers, Tue 5 Oct 10 from ScienceDaily

Neanderthals 'had sense of compassion'

The days of using the term "Neanderthal" as an insult may be on the way out as research published today shows the early humans had a deep-seated sense of compassion.

Tue 5 Oct 10 from The Independent

My bright idea: Neanderthals could show compassion

Our closest ancient relatives cared for their sick and the elderly much as we humans do, says Penny SpikinsDr Penny Spikins is a young archaeologist at the University of York who focuses her ...

Sat 9 Oct 10 from Guardian.co.uk

Neanderthals had deep sense of compassion, new study suggests

Neanderthals have been unjustly maligned as heartless brutes, according to researchers who claim the primitive humans possessed a deep-seated sense of compassion.

Tue 5 Oct 10 from Telegraph.co.uk Science

Prehistoric humans 'had compassion and cared for others'

Scientists examined archaeological evidence for the way emotions began to emerge in our ancestors as they became modern humans.

Tue 5 Oct 10 from Daily Mail

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