Stretchable fabric battery could power wearables with sweat

The bacteria-powered batteries of electrical engineer Seokheun Choi have taken on a number of interesting forms, including matchbooks, folding paper and ninja stars. For the first time, the Binghamton University researcher has now woven his innovative fuel cells into a flexible and stretchable piece of fabric that could one day power wearable electronics through our body's own bacteria... Continue Reading Stretchable fabric battery could power wearables with sweat Category: Electronics Tags: Battery Binghamton University Energy Microbial Fuel Cells Wearable Related Articles: Paper-based battery is fueled by spit Ninja star design throws extra power into the origami battery mix DNA-based sunscreen gets more effective with more use Paperback bacteria biobattery folds for different power levels

Stretchable fabric battery could power wearables with sweat

The bacteria-powered batteries of electrical engineer Seokheun Choi have taken on a number of interesting forms, including matchbooks, folding paper and ninja stars. For the first time, ...

Sun 10 Dec 17 from Gizmag

Scientists create stretchable battery made entirely out of fabric

A research team led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York has developed an entirely textile-based, bacteria-powered bio-battery that could one day be integrated into ...

Thu 7 Dec 17 from TechXplore

Scientists create stretchable battery made entirely out of fabric, Thu 7 Dec 17 from ScienceDaily

Scientists Create Stretchable Battery Made Entirely Out of Fabric, Thu 7 Dec 17 from Newswise

Scientists create stretchable battery made entirely out of fabric, Thu 7 Dec 17 from Eurekalert

Fabric-based biobattery could power future wearables

Researchers from Binghamton University have developed a textile-based bio-battery that could serve as the foundation for wearable electronics of the future.

Fri 8 Dec 17 from Techspot

Stretchable Battery Made Entirely out of Fabric

NewsA research team has developed an entirely textile-based, bacteria-powered biobattery that could one day be integrated into wearable electronics. Contributed Author: Binghamton UniversityTopics: Physics/Engineering

16 hours ago from Laboratory Equipment

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